Dayang/ Joanna / Pauie (lucillajoanna) wrote,
Dayang/ Joanna / Pauie
lucillajoanna

"Hey I'm a sacred vessel! All you have in your belly is Taco Bell!"

  • have been obsessed with converting all the stuff I copy and paste on notepads (fan fics, sonnets by Neruda) into PDF's.
  • UNO days.
Oncci had bought UNO cards on my birthday. I suspect it's actually his gift to me though he didn't say it. Hee.

My sister and I have stopped our tournament just yesterday, because it's their exams tomorrow. We don't take points, we just tally how often each of us wins. So far, Jouie's in the lead. For an eight-year old, she's a force to be reckoned with in UNO. And I'm not the kind who throws away games to kids at all. In fact, Jouie always feels the need to appease me with a hug when she wins a round.

Photobucket
~she's never gleeful as when she slams down that evil +4 action card.
  • Religion (ETA: Which meandered onto books in general, genre in particular): The draft I'm entering into NaNo is a big braid with religion as one of the golden plaits. I've collected information on this element (Creating a Religion, Religion Writing, etc.), and reread and reread Ursula Le Guin's The Tombs of Atuan. That's the... 'feel' I want to employ.

I'm also thankful to Dogland by Will Shetterley. I love this novel. It's one of those books I call 'jampacked'. It's not an epic, but I can't begin to account all the emotions and thoughts I was made to feel and think while immersed in it. It's like I've lived a life while reading. There are few books about which I can say the same. (Even HP, which I adore, only feels like a breeze in comparison somehow). The titles that come immediately to mind are To Kill a Mockingbird, Frances Hodgson Burnett's three novels, and David Baldacci's non-suspense Wish You Well.

So, books whose protagonists are kids, whose stories are fleshed out from the perspective of kids, and whose kids learn--and in consequence, teach-- about life.

This is quite an awakening. I always thought I liked fantasy best. I do love it, but I look at my shelves and see more Newbery/Pulitzer winners and Classics than fantasy.

Of course, this might be because fantasy is expensive. LOL. I'll definitely stock when I have a regular income.

Back to religion, let me quote from Dogland. I've been born to my faith, and I've always had it. But I'm pretty sure I decided and was not simply hardwired to keep it during those dark days when I was thirteen, and my decision continues to prove itself good. I don't really know my drive or my questions, if any. I've been too busy being happy and carefree and thankful to really ponder on this subject, but when I read these passages, things just clicked, also in a manner I won't be able to articulate as I wish, in case someone asks. The two good sides (not the extremist, intolerant ones, you know) of the coin, both simply and profoundly laid:



"Is there a God?"

"Some say there isn't. Some say there is, but they don't agree about the details. You got Christians, Jews, Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, and just about anything else you can think of. There's groups inside each of those groups arguing among themselves about who's worshiping right. I think when you get down to it, there's not two people in the world with the exact same idea about God."

"But is there a God?"

"Well. You can't know what you can't prove. You could ask me if there was a thousand-pound catfish in the Suwannee, and I couldn't say."

"But do you believe there is?"

Pa shrugged. "Catfish get pretty big."

... "Your ma and I had a deal. You kids get to decide for yourselves about God."

"But what about you, Pa? Do you believe in God?"

He studied me, then said, "No. I don't."

"Why not?"

"Well, I've seen horrible things done in the name of
God, and I've seen good things done by people who aren't religious at all. So I figure religion doesn't matter. If you live a good life and there's a God worthy of the name, you're probably covered."

"Mrs. Robbins says if you don't believe in Jesus, you'll go to hell."

"If God's that petty, I'll be glad to go. I'd rather be with Einstein, Gandhi, and Thomas Jefferson than with a bunch of TV preachers. Shoot, based on what Jesus said about hypocrites, he'll be down there with us."

"You won't be in heaven with us?"

Pa laughed. "If God's got any goodness in Him at all,
He'll let you come visit."

"God's bad?"

"If God was bad, He'd make things a lot worse than
they are. But if God was really all wise and all powerful and all kind, He'd make 'em a sight better. So I don't think there's a God at all."


~~~

"Mis' DeLyon?"

"Yes?"

"Do you believe in God?"

"Which one?"

"God. You know."

"Oh. Do you?"

"If God's nature."

She laughed. "I know where you got that."

"So, what do you think?"

"I think God is the moral and spiritual quality in each
of us."

"So you believe in God?"

"Hmm. Listen to me. God isn't a name. It's a title. A description. An idea. You're a boy, but your name isn't Boy. John Kennedys name isn't President. If you asked me whether I believed in the president, I would say yes, but that would not mean I believed John Kennedy existed. It would mean I believed John Kennedy was a good leader, or it would mean I believed in the office of president, that democracies are good things, and electing presidents is a good way to have a democracy. When you ask if I believe in God, you're not asking whether I believe there is a God. You're either asking whether I think God is good, or whether I think there should be a God."

"Oh. Okay."

"Oh, okay?"

"Okay, is God good, and should there be a God?"

"God is a wonderful idea. Yes, God should exist, and
we should worship God with everything we do."

"So, is God good?"

She looked at me, then tapped my forehead with her
finger. "You really shouldn't ask what you already know."

  •  I got Dogland free from Tor. And War for the Oaks by Emma Bull, too. It was delicious reading these two opposite books in tandem.
  • I can only imagine how nice it must be to have a spouse who's also a writer.
  • Thanks to Tor's fiction (the short story, Shade), I am now itching to have Jumper and Reflex by Steven Gould. We've had the DVD for ages and I've ignored it. Just found out of its better, tree by-product counterpart.

  • Dad and I have been text messaging like loons lately. I love him. He recommended chunkyroll dot com to me because it has all sorts of anime and Sailormoon, and all of them have subtitles! He still remembers how obsessed I used to be about Sailormoon, even if that was when I was eleven. Hehe. Aww. I've been obsessed over many things, but Sailormoon stands out because I nearly bankrupted my aunt's printing press because of it.

I gave away-- instead of sold-- the cardboard fans she made me bring to school.

Photobucket
~a relic from ten years ago. Nostalgia!

Well, I was eleven. Haha.

And is there even chunkyroll? I'm just about to check. Oncci says it's 'CRUNCHyroll'. *grins* My dadoink.
  • And this ends my rambling update. I have dollops of happiness for October and early November because of sembreak. Will see my MaCofWiz brujos and brujas, not to mention the new ones in Potter Syndicate.

  • If my entry to the Philippine Graphic/Fiction Awards is, why haven't I talked about it? It still isn't, that's why.

/headdesk
  • To read or to write, that is the question. I still have loads to read from Fantasy.

  • And here's Rory, whose ears decided they weren't floppy at all.

Photobucket

~~ the quote in my post title is from Juno. Lovely script by Diablo Cody.  
Tags: books, daddy, etc., jouie, life, religion, rory, will shetterley, writing
Subscribe

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 5 comments